Posts Written OnSeptember 2016

Fall Color Inspiration

 Why is it that when the weather cools down and the leaves start to turn, we suddenly crave change? It seems like almost everyone is switching up their look (including, of course, their hair).

To those of you who have decided to opt for a cut, I say congrats, and keep your scissors AWAY (I’ve been trying to grow my hair for like a decade). To those of you who are not ready to chop but want to change things up check out DevaCurl Pintura.

What’s Pintura you ask? A fancy way to color your curls. It literally means “to paint,” and with this technique colorists apply hues directly onto the hair without the use of foil. They “paint” this way because it allows more application freedom, as a result colorists are able to individually identify which curls catch the light the best, and highlight them to add more dimension to someone’s individual texture.  The technique was born at Devachan Salon nearly 20 years ago, and is exclusive to Deva stylists.

In layman’s terms: It’s a hair-coloring concept that makes your curls look pretty.

Want to learn more? You’re in luck. We’re sharing before and after pics from Devachan Salon colorists and Deva Certified colorists throughout the US. Each one showcases a different way to cure a summer color problem or inspire your next stunning shade.

Going Grey

For All Curl Kind is a place for members of the curl community to share (and rant about) their experiences. Today we’ve got a guest blogger, Talia – whose been in love with Deva for over a decade. She’s sharing her story on Going Grey.

It seems everywhere I look these days, there’s a new it-girl dyeing her hair some sort of lavender gray and being applauded for how edgy she looks. Of course, society isn’t as tickled by women who let their hair naturally go gray with age. Oddly I know this, because I fall both into both the “young gray” and “naturally gray” categories. At 28, with my hair already well into its stubborn silverhood, the lavender gray trend is now popular enough that I’m often asked if I’m dyeing my own. Perhaps due to these “edgy” young beauties, I’m somehow unintentionally in high-flying follicle fashion.

It hasn’t always been this way, though. In fact, the first time a person discovered my gray hair 14 years ago, it caused her to recoil in absolute horror.

This was 2002. Back then, it seemed there were only two choices for curly girls: Chemically alter/heat damage your hair or give in to how curls looked back then: A wet-looking, highly-gelled … situation … famously worn by Felicity (circa Season 2) and Justin Timberlake.

Personally, I took an iron to my locks.

Though I dreamed of stick-straight perfection, most days I looked like I had stuck my finger into an electrical socket. In a desperate attempt to stop me from putting a searing object inches from my face, my mother booked me an appointment at the original Devachan Salon.

Enter Carlos.

Breaking Up is Hard to Do

Look, I know I probably should’ve told you sooner. But this is a very delicate situation. I know change can be really hard. But, this is for the best – things are going to be so much better, because of this rebrand.

Now I know you’re thinking: BUT WHY?!

Well, for some people, shopping for the right product was hard. Certain names were confusing. And most importantly, it was IMPOSSIBLE to not confuse No-Poo and One Condition in the shower. (I mean really people?!)

So now we’re here. Think of this as DevaCurl 2.0.

New packaging. New how-to videos. BUT THE FORMULAS ARE STAYING THE SAME.

Finding Your Perfect DevaCurl Styler

Curly girls spend a lot of time shopping for products. It’s a little excessive.

Okay fine, it’s really excessive. DO NOT JUDGE US. NO ONE ASKED FOR YOUR OPINION.

But honestly, half the time is spent trying to decode however a brand categorizes its products. The level of confusion is disturbingly unnecessary. Shopping by curl type is borderline impossible.

Thankfully, someone at DevaCurl is a genius, because no longer do you shop for stylers by curl type– you shop by curl need.